Psychoanalysis essays

Among the most influential pages, we may mention those signed by Ernest Jones, the author of one Sigmund Freud biography, and Fritz Wittels. Freud himself wrote essential things about the history of psychoanalysis several times. The Hogart Press and the Institute of Psychoanalysis, Londonand other essays ordered by encyclopedias and editors provide the most authorized framework for placing psychoanalysis in a scientific, social and cultural context.

Psychoanalysis essays

Works on Freud and Freudian Psychoanalysis 1. Life Freud was born in Frieberg, Moravia inbut when he was four years old his family moved to Vienna where he was to live and work until the last years of his life.

He always considered himself first and foremost a scientist, endeavoring to extend the compass of human knowledge, and to this end rather than to the practice of medicine he enrolled at the medical school at the University of Vienna in He received his medical degree inand having become engaged to be married inhe rather reluctantly took up more secure and financially rewarding work as a doctor at Vienna General Hospital.

Shortly after his marriage inwhich was extremely happy and gave Freud six children—the youngest of whom, Anna, was to herself become a distinguished psychoanalyst—Freud set up a private practice in the treatment of psychological disorders, which gave him much of the clinical material that he based his theories and pioneering techniques on.

InFreud spent the greater part of a year in Paris, where he was deeply impressed by the work of the French neurologist Jean Charcot who was at that time using hypnotism to treat hysteria and other abnormal mental conditions.

When he returned to Vienna, Freud experimented with hypnosis but found that its beneficial effects did not last. At this point he decided to adopt instead a method suggested by the work of an older Viennese colleague and friend, Josef Breuer, who had discovered that when he encouraged a hysterical patient to talk uninhibitedly about the earliest occurrences of the symptoms, they sometimes gradually abated.

Early life and training

The treatment was to enable the patient to recall the experience to consciousness, to confront it in a deep way both intellectually and emotionally, and in thus discharging it, to remove the underlying psychological causes of the neurotic symptoms.

This technique, and the theory from which it is derived, was given its classical expression in Studies in Hysteria, jointly published by Freud and Breuer in Shortly thereafter, however, Breuer Psychoanalysis essays that he could not agree with what he regarded as the excessive emphasis which Freud placed upon the sexual origins and content of neuroses, and the two parted company, with Freud continuing to work alone to develop and refine the theory and practice of psychoanalysis.

Inafter a protracted period of self-analysis, he published The Interpretation of Dreams, which is generally regarded as his greatest work.

This was greatly facilitated inwhen he was invited to give a course of lectures in the United States, which Psychoanalysis essays to form the basis of his book Five Lectures on Psycho-Analysis. He was also not averse to critically revising his views, or to making fundamental alterations to his most basic principles when he considered that the scientific evidence demanded it—this was most clearly evidenced by his advancement of a completely new tripartite id, ego, and super-ego model of the mind in his work The Ego and the Id.

He was initially greatly heartened by attracting followers of the intellectual caliber of Adler and Jung, and was correspondingly disappointed when they both went on to found rival schools of psychoanalysis—thus giving rise to the first two of many schisms in the movement—but he knew that such disagreement over basic principles had been part of the early development of every new science.

After a life of remarkable vigor and creative productivity, he died of cancer while exiled in England in Backdrop to His Thought Although a highly original thinker, Freud was also deeply influenced by a number of diverse factors which overlapped and interconnected with each other to shape the development of his thought.

As indicated above, both Charcot and Breuer had a direct and immediate impact upon him, but some of the other factors, though no less important than these, were of a rather different nature.

Psychoanalysis essays

This was to become the personal though by no means exclusive basis for his theory of the Oedipus complex. Secondly, and at a more general level, account must be taken of the contemporary scientific climate in which Freud lived and worked.

In most respects, the towering scientific figure of nineteenth century science was Charles Darwin, who had published his revolutionary Origin of Species when Freud was four years old.

This made it possible and plausible, for the first time, to treat man as an object of scientific investigation, and to conceive of the vast and varied range of human behavior, and the motivational causes from which it springs, as being amenable in principle to scientific explanation.

Much of the creative work done in a whole variety of diverse scientific fields over the next century was to be inspired by, and derive sustenance from, this new world-view, which Freud with his enormous esteem for science, accepted implicitly. An even more important influence on Freud however, came from the field of physics.

The second fifty years of the nineteenth century saw monumental advances in contemporary physics, which were largely initiated by the formulation of the principle of the conservation of energy by Helmholz.

This principle states, in effect, that the total amount of energy in any given physical system is always constant, that energy quanta can be changed but not annihilated, and that consequently when energy is moved from one part of the system, it must reappear in another part.

The progressive application of this principle led to monumental discoveries in the fields of thermodynamics, electromagnetism and nuclear physics which, with their associated technologies, have so comprehensively transformed the contemporary world. From there it was but a short conceptual step—but one which Freud was the first to take, and on which his claim to fame is largely grounded—to the view that there is such a thing as " psychic energy ," that the human personality is also an energy-system, and that it is the function of psychology to investigate the modifications, transmissions and conversions of psychic energy within the personality which shape and determine it.

Freud was arguably the first thinker to apply deterministic principles systematically to the sphere of the mental, and to hold that the broad spectrum of human behavior is explicable only in terms of the usually hidden mental processes or states which determine it.

Sigmund Freud - Life and Work

Thus, instead of treating the behavior of the neurotic as being causally inexplicable—which had been the prevailing approach for centuries—Freud insisted, on the contrary, on treating it as behavior for which it is meaningful to seek an explanation by searching for causes in terms of the mental states of the individual concerned.

This suggests the view that freedom of the will is, if not completely an illusion, certainly more tightly circumscribed than is commonly believed, for it follows from this that whenever we make a choice we are governed by hidden mental processes of which we are unaware and over which we have no control.

The postulation of such unconscious mental states entails, of course, that the mind is not, and cannot be, either identified with consciousness, or an object of consciousness. To employ a much-used analogy, it is rather structurally akin to an iceberg, the bulk of it lying below the surface, exerting a dynamic and determining influence upon the part which is amenable to direct inspection—the conscious mind.

There are, he held, an indefinitely large number of such instincts, but these can be reduced to a small number of basic ones, which he grouped into two broad generic categories, Eros the life instinctwhich covers all the self-preserving and erotic instincts, and Thanatos the death instinctwhich covers all the instincts towards aggression, self-destruction, and cruelty.

Thus it is a mistake to interpret Freud as asserting that all human actions spring from motivations which are sexual in their origin, since those which derive from Thanatos are not sexually motivated—indeed, Thanatos is the irrational urge to destroy the source of all sexual energy in the annihilation of the self.

Psychoanalysis essays

Having said that, it is undeniably true that Freud gave sexual drives an importance and centrality in human life, human actions, and human behavior which was new and to many, shockingarguing as he does that sexual drives exist and can be discerned in children from birth the theory of infantile sexualityand that sexual energy libido is the single most important motivating force in adult life.

However, a crucial qualification has to be added here—Freud effectively redefined the term "sexuality" to make it cover any form of pleasure which is or can be derived from the body. Thus his theory of the instincts or drives is essentially that the human being is energized or driven from birth by the desire to acquire and enhance bodily pleasure.

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Initially, infants gain such release, and derive such pleasure, from the act of sucking. Freud accordingly terms this the "oral" stage of development.Essays, Articles and Book Excerpts on Shakespeare's Macbeth The Metre of Macbeth: Blank Verse and Rhymed Lines Macbeth Character Introduction Metaphors in Macbeth Soliloquy Analysis: If it were done when 'tis done ().

Sigmund Freud: Sigmund Freud, Austrian neurologist, founder of psychoanalysis. Freud’s article on psychoanalysis appeared in the 13th edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica.

Freud may justly be called the most influential intellectual legislator of his age. His creation of psychoanalysis was at once a theory of.

History and the Development of Psychoanalysis. Papers on this topic - The Cathartic Therapy, by Jean Chiriac - About Case Anna O (Abstract), by Sigmund Freud - The Secret Committee - The First International Congress of Psychoanalysis - Freud and Jung Lectures at Clark University in (Link) - The Wednesday Psychological .

History and the Development of Psychoanalysis. Papers on this topic - The Cathartic Therapy, by Jean Chiriac - About Case Anna O (Abstract), by Sigmund Freud - The Secret Committee - The First International Congress of Psychoanalysis - Freud and Jung Lectures at Clark University in (Link) - The Wednesday Psychological Society - History of the Psychoanalytic Movement (Abstract), by .

Free narrative papers, essays, and research papers. Narrative Memories, Life History, And Identity - Trouillot argues that this social process of narrating history makes us all amateur historians, learning more of our training and knowledge from likewise amateur historians than from the more recognized academic channels (Trouillot ).

Welcome to the Sigmund Freud Page! This site provides valuable information about the life and work of Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis.

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